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-founder. this was a very long, long journey with the city, but we had the help of leaders like phil, mayor lee, jay driving behind the scenes, the efforts for business to work with government. and i think we've accomplished that with this unique partnership moving forward. we're excited now there's cross-department collaboration with the san francisco arts, with the san francisco public art which has now been thanks to sean working late last night, putting the public arts into golden gate park. this is providing access. it's providing efficiency, and it's providing new revenue streams and opportunities for the city of san francisco and other departments. we are really excited to be here and i thank you all again for this opportunity to be able to innovate, to be able to work with the city of san francisco, and have this incredible opportunity to be here at the hatchery launching our application and our company. thank you very much. (applause) >> thank you, yo. so, san francisco has been a leader in open data for the past three years nationally. in 2009 we launched our open data initiative, one of the first
. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually talking about it because the demand side, as we were talking about it, will be there because there is going to be someone there. there have to be people working with it who are getting out there. i think this is what this city is going to be really powerful. in terms of other cities doing as well, chicago is doing some really interesting stuff. scary cool stuff. they're taking 3 in 1 data, pothole request and crime report and matching it up with social media. t
health fun and make the experience of health about exploring this great city that we're in and then showing the long-term health benefits of doing so. right now we're looking for beta users in the city and we'll launch in about a month or two. thank you very much. we're really happy to be here. (applause) >> cool, we're going to do a short panel talking about the state of open data and sort of what specifically some of these companies are doing which you've gotten a brief peek on. again, you're probably familiar with, already know who a lot of these people are. really quick go down and have everyone introduce them self. >> hello,ishv. my name is ian kalen, hottved by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their dai
, everyone, almost good evening, and welcome to san francisco city hall. i'm supervisor scott wiener. i have the honor of representing district 8 including the castro on the board of supervisors. and which district are formerly represented by harvey milk. supervisor olague likes to remind me we share the district 5 represented by milk. and we're here today to remember supervisor harvey milk and mayor george moscone who were brutally assassinated decades ago. and we gather every year to remember, and not just to remember and to mourn, but also to remember the positives and to remember frankly both of these great men and what they contributed to our community. you know, with respect to harvey milk, there will never, ever be another harvey milk in our community in terms of what he represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things
. and he had an immense pride in the city and county of san francisco like no other. i suspect that much of my love of the city comes from my exposure to george in those very early years. george went through a considerable amount of evolutionary process politically. he allowed john burton to talk him into running for the state legislature. an unsuccessful effort for the state assembly. he went on to become, obviously, a supervisor in the city and county of san francisco. and in those days it was a different city. it was dramatically different. there was no such thing as a so-called progressive, david campos. there was no such thing as somebody in that category. george moscone, philip burton, represented that which we all now richly enjoy. george went on to become a state senator. and in that capacity, scott, it was george moscone who shepherded the bill that removed criminal penalties between consenting adults in this state that cost people their positions as teachers, as doctors, as nurses, as lawyers in those days. it was a bill that we orchestrated together. and george did what has ne
and every day grateful that we live in a city that does not forget. but there's just something wrong in this notion that the day we remember our lost leaders is the most violent day of their lives, which in the case of my family was the most violent day of ours. it's almost as if we're giving the senselessness of these deaths way too much respect by centering our love and passion and memory and yearning on the day the beating hearts of these two men, hearts that were so brave, so unflinching, so immensely loving so full of life that they seemed larger than life, the day those beating hearts stopped forever. because, let's get this straight, george and harvey did not die noblely. there was no opera music. there was nothing heroic. there was nothing romantic to be found in the loss of my dad's life. it was a senseless act. and i think why that is after all these years of loving to talk at these beautifully intentioned memorials, i can no longer bear to remember george on the day of his death. so, i think i'm going to start next year and for years to come to stop remembering november 27
's heart and then he moves away towards the city hall of john's memory and john set the stairs in the way that george did, cocky and sexy, cruel as all get out. and then the song ends. and i notice the woman sitting next to me crying. and after the play is over, after the standing ovation of tony's brave and beautiful play, as people start to leave the theater, this woman, she remains in her chair and it seems she cannot move. i gently asked her if she's all right. and she nods. and she says without looking at me because she couldn't look at me, "i got to see my mayor again." so, maybe through art we can see again. about a month ago i braved going to the sf moment to check out the infamous bust of my dad and all i could remember growing up were the images of that controversial pedestal of gunshots and twinkies and don't think i didn't smile when i heard hostess went under. [laughter] (applause) but when i went to see the bust for that first time, a bust that i have to admit captured george's mile wide grin and dramatically imperfect teeth, i saw on the pedestal so many things that i didn'
are the folks, the people at the city and county of san francisco that pay our wageses so we can go home and support our families. so, we are at a track maintenance department true civil servants of the city of san francisco. we thank you, board members for doing your job. if you weren't doing your job, we wouldn't have a job. so, thank you very much. (applause) >> i'd also like to thank the board and mr. rifkin and mr. haley for giving me the opportunity to lead young and also the maintenance crew. again, to reiterate what young said, it's the guys, the boots on the ground that really carry this through, that when everyone else is sleeping, they're the ones out fixing the problems and getting the project done. so, i appreciate all of them, all your crew and all of the signal maintenance crew. >> thank you for outstanding work on these two vital projects. director heinicke. >> sure. i will say a special thank you. this has been as you know, terry and young, it's nice to see you. something of particular interest to me. and i think it would be remiss if i didn't note particular interest to
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)